2017 frauen Sexy Häkeln Quaste Bluse Strand Overalls Badeanzug Cover Up Strand Tragen Blusas Top in 2017 frauen Sexy Häkeln Quaste Bluse Strand Overalls Badeanzug Cover Up Strand Tragen Blusas Top

kawaii crop top, sommer top samt

Luxus Top Frauen

Summer boho blouse top. Wholesale nette bluse. Px0931. Vacation beach woman 's sunscreen. Sexy vest women sports: Sku284728. Harajuku, women tops, t shirt sexy femme. Ew917. 141216185. Opp bag. Acevog. Mit spitze tunika. 2018 damen sommer top. V1832Women shirts. ärmellos strickjacke chiffon. 

Wholesale Feitong 1128

Title: Spring summer women full sleeve blusas. Wholesale fisch druck sleeveless. Frauen shirts quaste. Chiffon bluse reißverschluss. Texiwas. 170520024928. Diamanten. Women tops and blouses fashion. 1*piece. Style3: Cold shoulder shirt. Neckline: Elegantes hemd weiß. 821421. 

Strand Vertuschen Robe

Type2 : 2017 fashion bluse langarm rüschen. 40407. Women loose blouses. Fin013181. Birdtree tb. Brown,white,black. Medium. Tops afrikanische. Vr068pm. 

Baumwolle Rundhals Langarm Blusen

Boho blusas: Womens summer batwingsleeve blouse, batwing sleeve tops. Sparshine. Garment care: : Dünnen gestreiften t. 2t-3t-4t-5t-6t-7t. Maxi chiffon cardigan beach blouses: 110311. Crop top t-shirt, vintage crop top t-shirts, crop top tshirt. Conmoto. Suit for season: Frau kimono 2017. 


" /><"http://blackkudos.tumblr.com/page/12" />
Now Playing Tracks

Isaac Hayes

image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Isaac Lee Hayes, Jr. (August 20, 1942 – August 10, 2008) was an American soul singer, songwriter, actor, producer, and voice artist. Hayes was one of the creative forces behind the southern soul music label Stax Records, where he served both as an in-house songwriter and as a session musician and record producer, teaming with his partner David Porter during the mid-1960s. Hayes and Porter, along with Bill Withers, the Sherman Brothers, Steve Cropper, and John Fogerty were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2005 in recognition of writing scores of notable songs for themselves, the duo Sam & Dave, Carla Thomas, and others. Hayes is also a 2002 inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The hit song “Soul Man”, written by Hayes and Porter and first performed by Sam & Dave, has been recognized as one of the most influential songs of the past 50 years by the Grammy Hall of Fame. It was also honored by The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, by Rolling Stone< /i> magazine, and by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) as one of the Songs of the Century. During the late 1960s, Hayes also began a career as a recording artist. He had several successful soul albums such as Hot Buttered Soul (1969) and Black Moses (1971). In addition to his work in popular music, he worked as a composer of musical scores for motion pictures.

He was well known for his musical score for the film Shaft (1971). For the “Theme fromShaft”, he was awarded the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1972. He became the third African-American, after Sidney Poitier and Hattie McDaniel, to win an Academy Award in any competitive field covered by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. He also won two Grammy Awards for that same year. Later, he was given his third Grammy for his music album Black Moses.

In recognition of his humanitarian work there Hayes wa s crowned honorary king of the Ada, Ghana region in 1992. He acted in motion pictures and television, such as in the movies Truck Turner and I’m Gonna Git You Sucka, and as Gandolf “Gandy” Fitch in the TV series The Rockford Files (1974–1980). From 1997 to 2006, he voiced the character Chef on the animated TV series South Park. His influences were Percy Mayfield, Big Joe Turner, James Brown, Jerry Butler, Sam Cooke, Fats Domino, Marvin Gaye, Otis Redding, and psychedelic soul groups like The Chambers Brothers and Sly and the Family Stone.

On August 5, 2003, Hayes was honored as a BMI Icon at the 2003 BMI Urban Awards for his enduring influence on generations of music makers. Throughout his songwriting career, Hayes received five BMI R&B Awards, two BMI Pop Awards, two BMI Urban Awards and six Million-Air citations. As of 2008, his songs generated more than 12 million performances. He also voice d the character of Chef in South Park for 10 seasons.

Life

Early life

Isaac Hayes, Jr. was born in Covington, Tennessee, in Tipton County. He was the second child of Eula (née Wade) and Isaac Hayes, Sr.

After his mother died young and his father abandoned his family, Isaac, Jr., was raised by his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Willie Wade, Sr. The child of a sharecropper family, he grew up working on farms in Shelby County, Tennessee, and in Tipton County. At age five Hayes began singing at his local church; he taught himself to play the piano, the Hammond organ, the flute, and the saxophone.

Hayes dropped out of high school, but his former teachers at Manassas High School in Memphis encouraged him to complete his diploma, which he did at age 21. After graduating from high school, Hayes was offered several music scholarships from colleges and universities. He turned down all of them to provide for his immediate family, working at a meat-pack ing plant in Memphis by day and playing nightclubs and juke joints several evenings a week in Memphis and nearby northern Mississippi.

Hayes’s first professional gigs, in the late 1950s, were as a singer at Curry’s Club in North Memphis, backed by Ben Branch’s houseband.

Career

Stax Records and 

Shaft

Hayes began his recording career in the early 1960s, as a session player for various acts of the Memphis-based Stax Records. He later wrote a string of hit songs with songwriting partner David Porter, including “You Don’t Know Like I Know”, “Soul Man”, “When Something Is Wrong with My Baby” and “Hold On, I’m Comin’” for Sam & Dave. Hayes, Porter and Stax studio band Booker T. & the M.G.’s were also the producers for Sam & Dave, Carla Thomas and other Stax artists during the mid-1960s. Hayes-Porter contributed to the Stax sound made famous durin g this period, and Sam & Dave credited Hayes for helping develop both their sound and style. In 1968, Hayes released his debut album, Presenting Isaac Hayes, a jazzy, largely improvised effort that was commercially unsuccessful.

His next album was Hot Buttered Soul, which was released in 1969 after Stax had gone through a major upheaval. The label had lost its largest star, Otis Redding, in a plane crash in December 1967. Stax lost all of its back catalog to Atlantic Records in May 1968. As a result, Stax executive vice president Al Bell called for 27 new albums to be completed in mid-1969; Hot Buttered Soul, was the most successful of these releases. This album is noted for Hayes’s image (shaved head, gold jewelry, sunglasses, etc.) and his distinct sound (extended orchestral songs relying heavily on organs, horns and guitars, deep bass vocals, etc.). Also on the album, Hayes reinterpreted “Walk On By” (which had been ma de famous by Dionne Warwick) into a 12-minute exploration. “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” starts with an eight-minute-long monologue before breaking into song, and the lone original number, the funky “Hyperbolicsyllabicsesquedalymistic” runs nearly ten minutes, a significant break from the standard three-minute soul/pop songs.

“Walk On By” would be the first of many times Hayes would take a Burt Bacharach standard, generally made famous as three-minute pop songs by Dionne Warwick or Dusty Springfield, and transform it into a soulful, lengthy and almost gospel number.

In 1970, Hayes released two albums, The Isaac Hayes Movement and To Be Continued. The former stuck to the four-song template of his previous album. Jerry Butler’s “I Stand Accused” begins with a trademark spoken word monologue, and Bacharach’s “I Just Don’t Know What to Do with Myself” is re-worked. The l atter spawned the classic “The Look of Love”, another Bacharach song transformed into an 11-minute epic of lush orchestral rhythm (mid-way it breaks into a rhythm guitar jam for a couple of minutes before suddenly resuming the slow love song). An edited three-minute version was issued as a single. The album also featured the instrumental “Ike’s Mood,” which segued into his own version of “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling”. Hayes released a Christmas single, “The Mistletoe and Me” (with “Winter Snow” as a B-side).

In early 1971, Hayes composed music for the soundtrack of the blaxploitation film Shaft. (in the movie, he also appeared in a cameo role as the bartender of No Name Bar). The title theme, with its wah-wah guitar and multi-layered symphonic arrangement, would become a worldwide hit single, and spent two weeks at number one in the Billboard Hot 100 in November. The remainde r of the album was mostly instrumentals covering big beat jazz, bluesy funk, and hard Stax-styled soul. The other two vocal songs, the social commentary “Soulsville” and the 19-minute jam “Do Your Thing,” would be edited down to hit singles. Hayes won an Academy Award for Best Original Song for the “Theme from Shaft”, and was nominated for Best Original Dramatic Score for the film’s score.

Later in the year, Hayes released a double album, Black Moses, that expanded on his earlier sounds and featured The Jackson 5’s song “Never Can Say Goodbye”. Another single, “I Can’t Help It”, was not featured on the album.

In 1972, Hayes would record the theme tune for the television series The Men and enjoy a hit single (with “Type Thang” as a B-side). He released several other non-album singles during the year, such as “Feel Like Making Love”, “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want to Be Right)” and “Rolling Down a Mountainside”. Atlantic would re-release Hayes’s debut album this year with the new title In The Beginning.

Hayes was back in 1973 with an acclaimed live double album, Live At Sahara Tahoe, and followed it up with the album Joy, with the eerie beat of the 15-minute title track. He moved away from cover songs with this album. An edited “Joy” would be a hit single.

In 1974, Hayes was featured in the blaxploitation films Three Tough Guys and Truck Turner, and he recorded soundtracks for both.Tough Guys was almost devoid of vocals and Truck Turner yielded a single with the title theme. The soundtrack score was eventually used by filmmaker Quentin Tarantino in the Kill Bill film series and has been used for over 30 years as the opening score of Brazil ian radio show Jornal de Esportes on the Jovem Pan station.

Unlike most African-American musicians of the period, Hayes did not sport an Afro and instead chose to shave his head bald.

HBS (Hot Buttered Soul Records) and bankruptcy

By 1974, Stax Records was having serious financial problems, stemming from problems with overextension and limited record sales and distribution. Hayes himself was deep in debt to Union Planters Bank, which administered loans for the Stax label and many of its other key employees. In September of that year, Hayes sued Stax for $5.3 million. As Stax was in deep debt and could not pay, the label made an arrangement with Hayes and Union Planters: Stax released Hayes from his recording and production contracts, and Union Planters would collect all of Hayes’s income and apply it towards his debts. Hayes formed his own label, Hot Buttered Soul, which released its product through ABC Records.

His new album, 1975's  ;Chocolate Chip saw Hayes embrace the disco sound with the title track and lead single. “I Can’t Turn Around” would prove a popular song as time went on. This would be Hayes’s last album to chart top 40 for many years. Later in the year, the all instrumental Disco Connection album fully embraced disco.

In 1976, the album cover of Juicy Fruit featured Hayes in a pool with naked women, and spawned the title track single and the classic “Storm Is Over”. Later the same year the Groove-A-Thon album featured the singles “Rock Me Easy Baby” and the title track. However, while all these albums were regarded as solid efforts, Hayes was no longer selling large numbers. He and his wife were forced into bankruptcy in 1976, as they owed over $6 million. By the end of the bankruptcy proceedings in 1977, Hayes had lost his home, much of his personal property, and the rights to all fut ure royalties earned from the music he had written, performed, and produced.

Basketball team ownership

On July 17, 1974, Hayes, along with Mike Storen, Avron Fogelman and Kemmons Wilson took over ownership of the American Basketball Association team the Memphis Tams. The prior owner was Charles O. Finley, the owner of the Oakland A’s baseball team. Hayes’s group renamed the team the Memphis Sounds. Despite a 66% increase in home attendance, hiring well regarded coach Joe Mullaney and, unlike in the prior three seasons, making the 1975 ABA Playoffs (losing to the eventual champion Kentucky Colonels in the Eastern Division semifinals), the team’s financial problems continued. The group was given a deadline of June 1, 1975, to sell 4,000 season tickets, obtain new investors and arrange a more favorable lease for the team at the Mid-South Coliseum. The group did not come through and the ABA took over the team, selling it to a group in Maryland that renamed th e team the Baltimore Hustlers and then the Baltimore Claws before the club finally folded during preseason play for the 1975-1976 season.

Polydor and hiatus, film work, and the Duke of New York

In 1977, Hayes was back with a new deal with Polydor Records, a live album of duets with Dionne Warwick did moderately well, and his comeback studio album New Horizon sold better and enjoyed a hit single “Out The Ghetto”, and also featured the popular “It’s Heaven To Me”.

1978's For the Sake of Love saw Hayes record a sequel to “Theme from Shaft” (“Shaft II”), but was most famous for the single “Zeke The Freak”, a song that would have a shelf life of decades and be a major part of the House movement in the UK. The same year, Fantasy Records, which had bought out Stax Records, released an album of Hayes’s non-album singles and archived recordings as a “new ” album, Hotbed, in 1978.

In 1979, Hayes returned to the Top 40 with Don’t Let Go and its disco-styled title track that became a hit single (U.S. #18), and also featured the classic “A Few More Kisses To Go”. Later in the year he added vocals and worked on Millie Jackson’s album Royal Rappin’s, and a song he co-wrote, “Deja Vu”, became a hit for Dionne Warwick and won her a Grammy for best female R&B vocal.

Neither 1980s And Once Again or 1981's Lifetime Thing produced notable songs or big sales, and Hayes chose to take a break from music to pursue acting.

In the 1970s, Hayes was featured in the films Shaft (1971) and Truck Turner (1974); he also had a recurring role in the TV series The Rockford Files as an old cellmate of Rockford’s, Gandolph Fitch (who always referred to Rockford as “Rockfish” much to his annoyance), including one episode alongside duet-partner Dionne Warwick. In the 1980s and 1990s, he appeared in numerous films, notably Escape from New York (1981), I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (1988), Prime Target (1991), and Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993), as well as in episodes of The A-Team and Miami Vice. He also attempted a musical comeback, embracing the style of drum machines and synth for 1986s U-Turn and 1988s Love Attack, though neither proved successful. In 1991 he was featured in a duet with fellow soul singer Barry White on White’s ballad “Dark and Lovely (You Over There)”.

Return to fame and stardom

In 1995, Hayes appeared as a Las Vegas minister impersonating Himself in the comedy series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.

Hayes launched a comeback on the Virgin label in May 1995 with Branded, an album of new material that earned impressive sales figures as well as positive reviews from critics who proclaimed it a return to form. A companion album released around the same time,Raw and Refined, featured a collection of previously unreleased instrumentals, both old and new.

In a rather unexpected career move shortly thereafter, Hayes charged back into the public consciousness as a founding star of Comedy Central’s controversial — and wildly successful — animated TV series, South Park. Hayes provided the voice for the character of “Chef”, the amorous elementary-school lunchroom cook, from the show’s debut on August 13, 1997 (one week shy of his 55th birthday), through the end of its ninth season in 2006. The role of Chef drew on Hayes’s talents both as an actor and as a singer, thanks to the character’s penchant for making conversational points in the form of crudely suggestive soul songs. An album of songs from the series appeared in 1998 with the title Chef Aid: The South Park Album reflecting Chef’s popularity with the show’s fans, and the Chef song “Chocolate Salty Balls” became a number-one U.K. hit. However, when South Park leaped to the big screen the following year with the smash animated musical South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut, Hayes/Chef was the only major character who did not perform a showcase song in the film; his lone musical contribution was “Good Love,” a track on the soundtrack album which originally appeared on Black Moses in 1971 and is not heard in the movie

In 2000, he appeared on the soundtrack of the French movie The Magnet on the song “Is It Really Home” written and composed by rapper Akhenaton (IAM) and composer Bruno Coulais.

In 2002, Hayes was inducted into th e Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. After he played a set at the Glastonbury Festival, the same year a documentary highlighting Isaac’s career and his impact on many of the Memphis artists in the 1960s onwards was produced, “Only The Strong Survive”.

In 2004, Hayes appeared in a recurring minor role as the Jaffa Tolok on the television series Stargate SG-1. The following year, he appeared in the critically acclaimed independent film Hustle & Flow. He also had a brief recurring role in UPN's Girlfriends as Eugene Childs (father of Toni).

South Park

During the late 1990s, Hayes gained new popularity as the voice of Chef on the Comedy Central animated television series South Park. Chef was a soul-singing cafeteria worker for South Park Elementary. A song from the series performed by Chef, “Chocolate Salty Balls (P.S. I Love You)”, received international radio airplay in 1999. It reached number one on the UK singles chart and also on the Irish singles chart. The track also appeared on the album Chef Aid: The South Park Album in 1998.

Scientology episode

In the South Park episode “Trapped in the Closet”, a satire of Scientology which aired on November 16, 2005, Hayes did not appear in his role as Chef. While appearing on the Opie and Anthony radio show about a month after the episode aired, Hayes was asked, “What did you think about when Matt and Trey did that episode on Scientology?”, he replied, “One thing about Matt and Trey, they lampoon everybody, and if you take that serious, I’ll sell you the Brooklyn Bridge for two dollars. That’s what they do.”

In an interview for The A.V. Club on January 4, 2006, Hayes was again asked about the episode. He said that he told the creators, Matt Stone and Trey Parker, “Guys , you have it all wrong. We’re not like that. I know that’s your thing, but get your information correct, because somebody might believe that shit, you know?” He then told them to take a couple of Scientology courses to understand what they do. In the interview, Hayes defended South Park’s style of controversial humor, noting that he was not pleased with the show’s treatment of Scientology, but conceding that he “understands what Matt and Trey are doing.”

Departure from 

South Park

On March 13, 2006, a statement was issued in Hayes’s name, indicating that he was asking to be released from his contract with Comedy Central, citing recent episodes which satirized religious beliefs as being intolerant. “There is a place in this world for satire, but there is a time when satire ends and intolerance and bigotry towards religious beliefs of others begins,” he was quoted in the press sta tement. However, the statement did not directly mention Scientology. A response from Matt Stone said that Hayes’ complaints stemmed from the show’s criticism of Scientology and that he “has no problem – and he’s cashed plenty of checks – with our show making fun of Christians, Muslims, Mormons or Jews.” Stone adds, “[We] never heard a peep out of Isaac in any way until we did Scientology. He wants a different standard for religions other than his own, and to me, that is where intolerance and bigotry begin.” Stone and Parker agreed to release Hayes from his contract by his request.

On March 20, 2006, Roger Friedman of Fox News reported having been told that the March 13 statement was made in Hayes’s name, but not by Hayes himself. He wrote: “Isaac Hayes did not quit South Park. My sources say that someone quit it for him. … Friends in Memphis tell me that Hayes did not issue any statements on his own about South Park. They are mystified.” Hayes then had a stroke.

In a 2007 interview, Hayes said he had quit because “they [Parker and Stone] didn’t pay me enough… They weren’t that nice.”

The South Park season 10 premiere (aired March 22, 2006) featured “The Return of Chef”, a thinly veiled telling of the affair from Parker and Stone’s point of view. Using sound clips from past episodes, it depicts Chef as having been brainwashed and urges viewers (via Kyle talking to the town) to “remember Chef as the jolly old guy who always broke into song” and not to blame Chef for his defection, but rather, as Kyle states, “be mad at that fruity little club for scrambling his brains.” In the episode, the cult that brainwashed Chef is named the “Super Adventure Club” and is depicted as a group of child molesters who travel the world to have sex with prepubescent children from exotic places. In the end, Chef is unable to break free from his brainwashing and dies an extremely gruesome death, falling off a cliff, being mutilated by wild animals and shot several times. At the end of the episode he is shown as being resurrected as a cyborg in the style of the resurrection of Darth Vader at the end of Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith.

After 

South Park

Hayes’ income was sharply reduced as a result of leaving South Park. There followed announcements that he would be touring and performing. A reporter present at a January 2007 show in New York City, who had known Hayes fairly well, reported that “Isaac was plunked down at a keyboard, where he pretended to front his band. He spoke-sang, and his words were halting. He was not the Isaac Hayes of the past.”

In April 2008, while a guest on The Adam Carolla Show, Hayes stumbled in his responses to qu estions—possibly as a result of health issues. A caller questioned whether Hayes was under the influence of a substance, and Carolla and co-host Teresa Strasser asked Hayes if he had ever used marijuana. After some confusion on what was being asked, Hayes replied that he had only ever tried it once. During the interview the radio hosts made light of Hayes’s awkward answers, and replayed Hayes comments as sound drops—often simulating conversation with his co-hosts. Hayes stated during this interview that he was no longer on good terms with Trey Parker and Matt Stone.

During the spring of 2008, Hayes shot scenes for a comedy about soul musicians inspired by the history of Stax Records entitled Soul Men, in which he appears as himself in a supporting role. His voice can be heard in the film in a voice-over role as Samuel L. Jackson, Bernie Mac (who died the day before Hayes), and Sharon Leal’s characters are traveling through Memphis, Tennessee. His first actual appearance in the film is when he is shown in the audience clapping his hands as The Real Deal does a rendition of Hayes’s 1971 hit song “Do Your Thing.” His next appearance consists of him entering The Real Deal’s dressing room to wish them luck on their performance and shaking hands with Louis Hinds (played by Jackson) and Floyd Henderson (played by Mac). During this scene, Hayes also helps Hinds reunite with his long-lost daughter Cleo (played by Leal). His final appearance in the film consists of him introducing The Real Deal to the audience. The film was released on November 7, 2008.

Two months after his death, the South Park episode “The China Probrem” was dedicated to him.

Personal life

Family

Hayes had 12 children, 14 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Hayes’s first marriage was to Dancy Hayes in 1960, ended in divorce.

Hayes’s second marriage was to Emily Ruth Watson on November 24, 1965. This marriage ended in divorce in 1972. Children from this marriage included Vincent Eric Hayes, Melanie Mia Hayes, and Nicole A. Hayes (McGee).

He married bank teller Mignon Harley on April 18, 1973, and they divorced in 1986; they had two children. Hayes and his wife were eventually forced into bankruptcy, owing over $6 million. Over the years, Isaac Hayes was able to recover financially.

His fourth wife, Adjowa, gave birth to a son named Nana Kwadjo Hayes on April 10, 2006. He also had one son who is his namesake, Isaac Hayes III, known as rap producer Ike Dirty. Hayes’s eldest daughter is named Jackie, also named co-executor of his estate and other children to follow Veronica, Felicia, Melanie, Nikki, Lili, Darius, and Vincent and he also had a daughter named Heather Hayes.

Scientology activism

Hayes took his first Scientology course in 1993, later contributing endorsement blurbs for many Scientology books ov er the ensuing years. In 1996, Hayes began hosting The Isaac Hayes and Friends Radio Show on WRKS in New York City. While there, Hayes became a client of young vegan raw food chef Elijah Joy and his company Organic Soul, Inc. Hayes also appears in the Scientology film Orientation.

In 1998, Hayes and fellow Scientologist entertainers Anne Archer, Chick Corea and Haywood Nelson attended the 30th anniversary ofFreedom Magazine, the Church of Scientology’s investigative news journal, at the National Press Club in Washington DC, to honor eleven activists.

In 2001, Hayes and Doug E. Fresh, another Scientologist musician, recorded a Scientology-inspired album called The Joy Of Creating – The Golden Era Musicians And Friends Play L. Ron Hubbard.

Charitable work

The Isaac Hayes Foundation was founded in 1999 by Hayes.

In February 2006, Hayes appeared in a Youth for Human Rights International music video called “Unit ed”. YHRI is a human rights group founded by the Church of Scientology.

Hayes was also involved in other human rights related groups such as the One Campaign. Isaac Hayes was crowned a chief in Ghana for his humanitarian work and economic efforts on the country’s behalf.

Stroke and death

On March 20, 2006, Roger Friedman of Fox News reported that Hayes had suffered a minor stroke in January. Hayes’s spokeswoman, Amy Harnell, denied this, but on October 26, 2006, Hayes himself confirmed that he had suffered a stroke.

Hayes was found unresponsive in his home located just east of Memphis on August 10, 2008, ten days before his 66th birthday, as reported by the Shelby County, Tennessee Sheriff’s Department. A Shelby County Sheriff’s deputy and an ambulance from Rural Metro responded to his home after three family members found him unresponsive on the floor next to a still-operating treadmill. Hayes was taken to Baptist Memorial Hospi tal in Memphis, where he was pronounced dead at 2:08 p.m. The cause of death was not immediately clear, though the area medical examiners later listed a recurrence of stroke as the cause of death. He was buried at Memorial Park Cemetery.

Legacy

The Tennessee General Assembly enacted legislation in 2010 to honor Hayes by naming a section of Interstate 40 the “Isaac Hayes Memorial Highway”. The name was applied to the stretch of highway in Shelby County from Sam Cooper Boulevard in Memphis east to the Fayette County line. The naming was made official at a ceremony held on Hayes’s birth anniversary in August 2010.

Awards and nominations

Discography

  • Presenting Isaac Hayes (1968)
  • Hot Buttered Soul (1969)
  • The Isaac Hayes Movement (1970)
  • …To Be Continued (1970)
  • Black Moses (1971)
  • Joy (1973)
  • Chocolate Ch ip (1975)
  • Disco Connection (1975)
  • Groove-A-Thon (1976)
  • Juicy Fruit (Disco Freak) (1976)
  • New Horizon (1977)
  • For the Sake of Love (1978)
  • Don’t Let Go (1979)
  • And Once Again (1980)
  • Lifetime Thing (1981)
  • U-Turn (1986)
  • Love Attack (1988)
  • Raw & Refined (1995)
  • Branded (1995)

http://wikipedia.thetimetube.com/?q=Isaac+Hayes&lang=en

Geoffrey Holder

image
image
image
image
image

Geoffrey Lamont Holder (August 20, 1930 – October 5, 2014) was a Trinidadian-American actor, choreographer, dancer, painter, singer, and Tony Award-winning stage director and costume designer. He was known for his height (6 ft 6 in), “hearty laugh” and heavily accented bass voice.

Early life

One of four children, of parents who had emigrated to the United States from Trinidad, Holder attended Tranquillity School and then secondary school at Queen’s Royal College in Port-of-Spain. At the age of seven, he made his debut in the dance company of his elder brother Boscoe Holder, from whom he had been receiving lessons in dancing and painting.

Career

In 1952, choreographer Agnes de Mille saw Geoffrey Holder dance in St. Thomas. She invited him to New York; he would teach at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance for two years.

Holder was a principal dancer with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet in New York City from 1955 to 1956. He made his Broadway debut in House of Flowers, a musical by Harold Arlen (music and lyrics) and Truman Capote (lyrics and book). He also starred in an all-black production of Waiting for Godot in 1957.

Holder began his movie career in the 1962 British film All Night Long, a modern remake of Shakespeare's Othello. He followed that with Doctor Dolittle (1967) as Willie Shakespeare, leader of the natives of Sea-Star Island. In 1972, he was cast as the Sorcerer inEverything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex*. The following year he was a henchman – Baron Samedi – in the Bond movie Live and Let Die; He contributed to the film’s choreography.

In addition to his movie appearances, Holder became a spokesman for the 1970s and 1980s 7 Up soft drink “uncola” and 1980s “crisp and clean, and no caffeine” and “never had it, never will” advertising campaigns.

In 1975 Holder won two Tony Awards for direction and costume design of The Wiz, the all-black musical version of The Wizard of Oz. Holder was the first black man to be nominated in either category. He won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design. The show ran for 1672 performances.

As a choreographer, Holder created dance pieces for many companies, including the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, for which he provided choreography, music and costumes for Prodigal Prince (1967), and the Dance Theatre of Harlem, for which he provided choreography, music and costumes for Dougla (1974) and designed costumes for Firebird (1982). In 1978, Holder directed and choreographed the Broadway musical Timbuktu! Holder’s 1957 piece “Bele” is part of the Dance Theater of Harlem repertory.

In the 1982 film Annie, Holder played the role of Punjab. He was in the 1992 film Boomerang with Eddie Murphy. He was also the voice of Ray in Bear in the Big Blue House and provided narration for Tim Burton’s version of Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. He reprised his role as the 7 Up Spokesman in the 2011 season finale of The Celebrity Apprentice, where he appeared as himself in a commercial for “7 Up Retro” for Marlee Matlin’s team.

Holder was a prolific painter (patrons of his art included Lena Horne and William F. Buckley, Jr.), ardent art collector, book author and music composer. As a painter, he won a Guggenheim Fellowship i n fine arts in 1956. A book of his photography, Adam, was published by Viking Press in 1986.

Personal life

In 1955, Holder married dancer Carmen de Lavallade, whom he met when both were in the cast of the musical House of Flowers. They lived in New York City and had one son, Léo. They were the subject of a 2004 film, Carmen & Geoffrey. His elder brother Boscoe Holder was a renowned dancer, choreographer and artist. His nephew is Christian Holder (Boscoe’s son), who has also won acclaim as a dancer, choreographer and entertainer.

Death

Geoffrey Holder died in Manhattan from complications from pneumonia on October 5, 2014. His immediate survivors were his wife, Carmen, and their son Léo,.

Productions

Broadway

  • Waiting for Godot, revival (all black cast), 1957 – performer
  • House of Flowers, Original Musical, 1954 – Banda dance choreography, performer
  • Josephine B aker, musical review, 1954 – performer
  • The Wiz, original musical, 1975 – direction, costume design (Tony Award for Best Costume Design and Best Direction of a Musical, 1975)
  • Timbuktu!, original ousical, 1978  – direction, choreography, costume design, playbill cover illustration
  • The Wiz, revival, 1984 – direction, costume design
  • The Boys’ Choir of Harlem and Friends, staged concert, 1993 – staging

Radio

  • KYOT-FM in Phoenix, Arizona, 1994–2011 – Voiceover

http://wikipedia.thetimetube.com/?q=Geoffrey+Holder&lang=en

The New York Times obituary: 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/07/arts/geoffrey-holder-dancer-choreographer-and-man-of-flair-dies-at-84.html?_r=0#

Don King

image
image
image
image
image
image

Donald (Don) King (born August 20, 1931) is an American boxing promoter whose career highlights include promoting “The Rumble in the Jungle” and the “Thrilla in Manila”. King has promoted some of the most prominent names in boxing, including Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, George Foreman, Larry Holmes, Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Julio César Chávez, Ricardo Mayorga, Andrew Golota, Bernard Hopkins, Félix Trinidad, Roy Jones, Jr. and Marco Antonio Barrera. Almost all of them sued him for defrauding them; King settled most lawsuits for six- to eight-digit pay-offs while managing to avoid a conviction of felony fraud or time in jail.

Early life

King was born in Cleveland, Ohio, where he attended school and graduated from John Adams High in 1951. After dropping out of Kent State University, he ran an illegal bookmaking operation out of the basement of a record store on Kinsman Road, and was charged for killing two men in incidents 13 years apart. The first was determined to be justifiable homicide after it was found that King shot Hillary Brown in the back and killed him while he was attempting to rob one of King’s gambling houses. King was convicted of second degree murder for the second killing in 1966 after he was found guilty of stomping to death an employee, Sam Garrett, who owed him $600. In an ex parte meeting with King’s attorney, the judge reduced King’s conviction to nonnegligent manslaughter for which King served just under four years in prison. King was later pardoned for the crime in 1983 by Ohio Governor Jim Rhodes, with letters from Jesse Jackson, Coretta Scott King, George Voinovich, Art Modell, and Gabe Paul, among others, being written in support of King.

Career

King entered the boxing world after convincing Muhammad Ali to box in a charity exhibitio n for a local hospital in Cleveland with the help of singer Lloyd Price. Early on he formed a partnership with a local promoter named Don Elbaum, who already had a stable of fighters in Cleveland and years of experience in boxing. In 1974, King negotiated to promote a heavyweight championship fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman in Zaire, popularly known as “The Rumble in the Jungle”. The fight between Ali and Foreman was a much-anticipated event. King’s rivals all sought to promote the bout, but King was able to secure the then-record $10 million purse through an arrangement with the government of Zaire.

King solidified his position as one of boxing’s preeminent promoters the following year with the third fight between Ali and Joe Frazier in Manila, the capital of the Philippines, which King deemed the “Thrilla in Manila”. Aside from promoting the premier heavyweight fights of the 1970s, King was also busy expanding his boxing empire . Throughout the decade, he compiled an impressive roster of fighters, many of whom would finish their career with Hall of Fame credentials. Fighters including Larry Holmes, Wilfred Benítez, Roberto Durán, Salvador Sánchez, Wilfredo Gómez, and Alexis Argüello would all fight under the Don King Productions promotional banner in the 1970s.

For the next two decades, King continued to be among boxing’s most successful promoters. Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Julio César Chávez, Aaron Pryor, Bernard Hopkins, Ricardo López, Félix Trinidad, Terry Norris, Carlos Zárate, Azumah Nelson, Andrew Gołota, Mike McCallum, Gerald McClellan, Meldrick Taylor, Marco Antonio Barrera, Tomasz Adamek, and Ricardo Mayorga are some of the boxers who chose King to promote many of their biggest fights.

Outside of boxing, he also managed The Jacksons’ 1984 Victory Tour. In 1998, King purchased a Cleveland-based weekl y newspaper serving the African-American community in Ohio, the Call and Post, and as of 2011 continued as its publisher.

King, was elected to the Gaming Hall of Fame in 2008.

Personal life

Don King’s wife Henrietta died on December 2, 2010 at the age of 87. He has a daughter Debbie, and sons, Carl and Eric. He has five grandchildren. King is politically active and made media appearances promoting George W. Bush during the 2004 U.S. presidential election, which included attendance at the 2004 Republican National Convention in New York City. On June 10, 1987 King was made a Mason-on-Sight by Grand Master Odes J. Kyle Jr. of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Ohio; thereby making him a Prince Hall Freemason. The following year he was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Humane letters degree from Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio, by University President Dr. Arthur E. Thomas.

Don King supported Barack Obama in the 2008 and 2012 Pr esidential Elections.

King has conducted an annual turkey giveaway each Christmas for several years, in which he distributes two thousand free turkeys to needy South Floridians.

Television

King frequently appears on talk show The Howard Stern Show to promote fights. He has been portrayed by Dave Chappelle in a skit about a “Gay America”, promoting a boxing match between two homosexual boxers. In 1995, HBO aired Tyson, a television movie based upon the life of Mike Tyson where King was portrayed by actor Paul Winfield.

In 1997, actor Ving Rhames played King in a made-for-TV movie, Don King: Only in America which aired on HBO. Rhames won a Golden Globe Award for his portrayal of King. In a 1998 episode of South Park, titled “Damien”, Jesus and Satan are to have a boxing match to decide the conflict between good and evil, and Don King represents Satan.

In its first season, In Living Color featur ed a one-time sketch titled “King: The Early Years”, set in a schoolyard in 1939, in which the narrator led viewers to believe that Martin Luther King, Jr. got his start in childhood as a peacemaker between two fighting classmates—until “King” was revealed as a young Don King (portrayed by Damon Wayans), who promoted the schoolyard scuffle.

In the episode “My Brother’s Keeper” of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Carlton is portrayed as Don King in one of Will’s dreams. Additionally, in the Will Smith song “I Think I Can Beat Mike Tyson”, King is mentioned. On an episode of Boy Meets World, Cory is having really bad hair problems, and his hair is similar to Don King’s. One kid even made fun of Cory by saying, “Hey look, it’s Don King.” In Celebrity Deathmatch, King’s death was a running gag during the series’ first season. In the final episode of the second season, he was matched against Donald Trump, with King being killed again, this time in the ring.

Movies

King acted in a small role as more or less himself in 1982's The Last Fight and in the 1985 comedy Head Office. He also had another brief cameo as himself in the 1997 movie The Devil’s Advocate. The film Don King: Only in America, a Biography of fight promoter Don King, follows his rise from a street goon convicted of strong arm tactics to a minor music promoter to pulling off his first major fight with Muhammad Ali for a charity.

Don King made an appearance in the 2008 documentary Beyond the Ropes and in the 2011 documentary Klitschko.

Video games

In the Xbox video game Jade Empire, a character named Qui The Promoter is based on Don King, including personality and his speech patterns. In the game ABC Wide World of Sports Boxing the top manager is reminiscent of King. Also, Don King helped create a vide o game called Don King Presents: Prizefighter for the Xbox 360, which he promoted on IGN’s podcast Three Red Lights, and another called Don King Boxing for the Wii. There is also a Nintendo DS version of Don King Boxing.

Controversies

King has been investigated for possible connections with organized crime. During a 1992 Senate investigation, King invoked the Fifth Amendment when questioned about his connection to mobster John Gotti. In public, however, King has strongly denied any connections to organized crime and has responded to mob allegations by calling them “racist”.

Mike Tyson, the former undisputed World Heavyweight Boxing Champion, says of his former manager, “(King is) a wretched, slimy, reptilian motherfucker. This is supposed to be my ‘black brother’, right? He’s just a bad man, a real bad man. He would kill his own mother for a dollar. He’s ruthless, he’s deplorable, he&rsq uo;s greedy … and he doesn’t know how to love anybody.”

Lawsuits and prosecutionsMuhammad Ali

King has been involved in several litigation cases with boxers that were focused on fraud. In 1982 he was sued by Muhammad Ali for underpaying him $1.1 million for a fight with Larry Holmes. King called in an old friend of Ali, Jeremiah Shabazz, and handed him a suitcase containing $50,000 in cash and a letter ending Ali’s lawsuit against King. He asked Shabazz to visit Ali (who was in hospital due to his failing health) and get him to sign the letter and then give Ali the $50,000. Ali signed. The letter even gave King the right to promote any future Ali fights. According to Shabazz, “Ali was ailing by then and mumbling a lot. I guess he needed the money.” Shabazz later regretted helping King. Ali’s lawyer cried when he learned that Ali had ended the lawsuit without telling him.

Larry Holmes

Larry Holmes has alleged that over the course of his career King cheated him out of $10 million in fight purses, including claiming 25% of his purses as a hidden manager. Holmes says he received only $150,000 of a contracted $500,000 for his fight with Ken Norton, and $50,000 of $200,000 for facing Earnie Shavers, and claims King cut his purses for bouts with Muhammad Ali, Randall “Tex” Cobb, and Leon Spinks, underpaying him $2 million, $700,000, and $250,000, respectively. Holmes sued King over the accounting and auditing for the Gerry Cooney fight, charging that he was underpaid by $2 to $3 million. Holmes sued King after King deducted a $300,000 ‘finder’s fee’ from his fight purse against Mike Tyson; Holmes settled for $150,000 and also signed a legal agreement pledging not to give any more negative information about King to reporters.

Tim Witherspoon

Tim Witherspoon was threatened with being blackballed if he did not sign exclusive contracts with King and his stepson C arl. Not permitted to have his own lawyer present, he signed four “contracts of servitude” (according to Jack Newfield). One was an exclusive promotional contract with Don King, two were managerial contracts with Carl King, identical except one was “for show” that gave Carl King 33% of Witherspoon’s purses and the other gave King a 50% share, more than is allowed by many boxing commissions. The fourth contract was completely blank.

Other examples include Witherspoon being promised $150,000 for his fight with Larry Holmes, but receiving only $52,750. King’s son Carl took 50% of Witherspoon’s purse, illegal under Nevada rules, and the WBC sanctioning fee was also deducted from his purse. He was forced to train at King’s own training camp at Orwell, Ohio, instead of Ali’s Deer Lake camp which Ali allowed Witherspoon to use for free. For his fight with Greg Page he received a net amount of $44,460 from his guaranteed purse of $25 0,000. King had deducted money for training expenses, sparring partners, fight and airplane tickets for his friends and family. Witherspoon was never paid a stipulated $100,000 for his training expenses and instead was billed $150 a day for using King’s training camp. Carl King again received 50% of his purse, despite Don King Promotions falsely claiming he had only been paid 33%. HBO paid King $1,700,000 for Witherspoon to fight Frank Bruno. Witherspoon got a purse of $500,000, but received only $90,000 after King’s deductions. Carl King received $275,000. In 1987 Witherspoon sued King for $25 million in damages. He eventually settled for $1 million out of court.

Mike Tyson

Mike Tyson sued King for $100 million, alleging the boxing promoter cheated him out of millions over more than a decade. It was settled out of court for $14 million.

Terry Norris

In 1996 Terry Norris sued King, alleging that King had stolen money from him and conspired with his manager to underpay him for fights. The case went to trial, but King settled out of court for $7.5 million in 2003. King also conceded to Norris’ insistence that the settlement be made public.

ESPN

In 2005 King launched a $2.5 billion defamation suit against ESPN, the makers of SportsCentury, after a documentary alleged that King had “killed, not once, but twice”, threatened to break Larry Holmes’ legs, cheated Meldrick Taylor out of $1 million, and then threatened to have Taylor killed. Though the documentary repeated many claims already made, King said he had now had enough. King’s attorney said “It was slanted to show Don in the worst way. It was one-sided from day one, Don is a strong man, but he has been hurt by this.”

The case was dismissed on summary judgment with a finding that King could not show “actual malice” from the defendants. Judge Dorian Damoorgian ruled, “Nothing in the record shows th at ESPN purposefully made false statements about King in order to bolster the theme of the program or to inflict harm on King.”

Lennox Lewis

In May 2003, King was sued by Lennox Lewis, who wanted $385 million from the promoter, claiming King used threats to pull Tyson away from a rematch with Lewis.

Chris Byrd

In early 2006, Chris Byrd sued Don King for breach of contract and the two eventually settled out of court under the condition that Byrd would be released from his contract with King.

http://wikipedia.thetimetube.com/?lang=en&q=Don%20King%20(boxing%20promoter)

Al Roker

image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Albert Lincoln (Al) Roker, Jr. (born August 20, 1954) is an American television personality, weather forecaster, actor, and book author. He is best known as being the weather anchor on NBC's Today. On Monday, July 20, 2009, he began co-hosting his morning show, Wake Up with Al, on The Weather Channel, which airs weekdays live from 5:30 to 7:00 am ET one hour and a half earlier than Today. Roker also appears occasionally on NBC Nightly News. He holds an expired American Meteorological Society Television Seal, #238. Writing with Dick Lochte, Roker began a series of murder mysteries in 2009 that feature Billy Blessing, a celebrity chef turned amateur detective. The second book in the series, The Midnight Show Murders (2010), was nominated for a 2011 Nero Award. On November 12, 2014, 10 PM Eastern Standard Time, Al Roker attempted to beat the previous unofficial world record of 33 hours held by Norwegian weather broadcaster Eli Kari Gjengedal. On November 14, 2014, 8 AM Eastern Standard Time, Al Roker set the new, official Guinness World Record with a 34-hour uninterrupted live weather report.

Early life

Al Roker was born in Queens, New York, the son of Isabel, of Jamaican descent, and Albert Lincoln Roker, Sr., a bus driver of Bahamian descent. Roker initially wanted to be a cartoonist. He was raised Catholic (i n the faith of his mother) and graduated from Xavier High School in Manhattan. He worked on several projects as a member of the school’s Cartooning & Illustration Club. He attended the State University of New York at Oswego where he received a B.A. in communications in 1976. Roker is the cousin of actress Roxie Roker, who was most notable for her role as Helen Willis on the sitcom The Jeffersons and the mother of popular rock musician Lenny Kravitz.

Career

Before the national recognition, Roker worked as a weather anchor for CBS affiliate WHEN-TV (now WTVH) in Syracuse, New York from 1974 until 1976, while he was still enrolled at SUNY Oswego. Following the completion of his collegiate studies, Roker moved to Washington, D.C. and took a weathercasting position at independent station WTTG, then owned by Metromedia, remaining there for much of the next two years.

Roker’s career with NBC began in 1978 when he was hired at WKYC-TV in Cleveland , then an NBC owned-and-operated station. After five successful years in Cleveland, Roker was promoted to the network’s flagship outlet, WNBC-TV in his hometown. Roker returned to New York City in late 1983 as a weekend weathercaster, and within eight months became the station’s regular weeknight weathercaster. Roker replaced 27-year WNBC-TV veteran Dr. Frank Field, who left the network after a contract dispute. From 1983 to 1996, Roker was the regular substitute for forecaster Joe Witte on the NBC News program NBC News at Sunrise, and from 1990 to 1995 filled-in for Willard Scott and Bryant Gumbel on the Today Show. In 1995, he became the host of The Al Roker Show, a weekend talk show on CNBC. In 1996–1997, he hosted a game show on MSNBC called Remember This?.

Roker started getting more exposure, especially when David Letterman asked him to do an elevator race with him in one episode of his talk show Late Night with David Letterman, wh ich taped across the hall from WNBC’s news studio in the GE Building. That led Roker to getting a job as the forecaster for Weekend Today. He also substituted on the weekday edition of Today when Willard Scott was ill or away. In 1996, Scott announced his semi-retirement from the show, and Roker received the weekday weather position onToday, where he has been since. He officially joined Today on January 26, 1996. Roker became popular for doing his forecasts outside the studio, interviewing audience members and giving some of them camera time. Roker also began doing more interviews and segments on the show as time progressed.

In 2005, Roker reported from inside Hurricane Wilma. A popular viral video exists on the internet of Roker being swept off his feet by the force of the hurricane and holding on to his cameraman.

Roker is a game show fan, and hosted a week-long segment on Today in honor of five game shows and their hosts. He also appeared as a celebrity player on both Merv Griffin game shows Jeopardy! and Wheel of Fortune. In 2008, Roker hosted NBC's Celebrity Family Feud. Roker also substituted Meredith Vieira for a week of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire shows on March 5–9, 2007. Roker also hosted the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Roker also hosts various programs on Food Network, namely, Roker on the Road, and Tricked-Out Tailgating. He is also the author of several non-fiction books, and an avid barbecue enthusiast.

Roker was also the forecaster for several radio stations, including the New York smooth jazz radio station WQCD (101.9 FM) and for Cleveland smooth jazz station WNWV (107.3 FM). The service was called the “Al Roker Radio Weather Network”, it was provided by United Stations Radio Networks. He has since been replaced on those networks by Accuweather. Roker currently has a one and a half hour weekday morning sti nt live from 5:30–7:00 a.m. on The Weather Channel under the name Wake Up with Al.

Personal life

Roker’s wife, his second, is fellow journalist Deborah Roberts, who has reported for both ABC and NBC, met Roker when she joined NBC in 1990 as a reporter.

Roker has three children, two daughters Courtney (b. 1987) and Leila (b. 1998) and one son Nicholas Albert (b. 2002).

On November 7, 2010, he ran in the ING New York City Marathon.

According to the July 2011 issue of Us Weekly in “25 Things You Did Not Know About Me”, Roker is a first cousin to late actress Roxie Roker (Helen Willis character on The Jeffersons television series) and a first cousin once removed of rocker Lenny Kravitz.

Health problems

In 2002, Roker underwent gastric bypass surgery to lose weight, which he said he did after failing at numerous diets. Eight months after that surgery, the New York Daily News reported he had dropped 100 pounds (45 kg) off his 320-pound figure. On Thursday, June 7, Roker underwent a total knee arthoplasty (replacement, or “TKA”) on his left knee. In 2005, Roker had a back operation.

Charity work

In 2007, Roker became an official supporter of Ronald McDonald House Charities and is a member of their celebrity board, called the Friends of RMHC. He also served as the official spokesperson for Amtrak’s National Train Day, which took place on May 10, 2008.

Olympic logo controversy

On June 7, 2007, Roker described the reaction to the logo for 2012 Summer Olympics:

Remember that controversial Olympic logo for the 2012 Olympics in London? Some folks have complained that the campaign actually sent them into epileptic seizures. Well, we asked you to weigh in on our website in an informal poll; those of you who could get up off the floor after shaking around were able to actually log in.

The following day Roker stated, “I started joking about [the logo]. I want to make this clear—I was not joking about epilepsy or anyone who suffers from epilepsy. We understand and know that this is a serious affliction and would never joke about that. We were joking about the logo—not about epilepsy. If anybody was offended, I heartily and really humbly apologize.”

Signature phrases

  • On many occasions on Today he has used the phrase “man candy” to describe attractive males.
  • At the end of his weather segments, when they cut to local broadcasters for regional updates, he says, “That’s what’s going on around the country. Here’s what’s happening in your neck of the woods.” (Willard Scott’s outcue phrase was “Here’s what’s happening in your world, even as we speak.”)
  • When he mentions Sunday’s weather forecast on Fridays, often he restates the word &ldq uo;Sunday” affecting the voice of an announcer of a vintage drag racing radio commercial. This comes from his announcing the NFL Sunday Night Football Game on NBC where this echo effect is also used on his voice.

Other appearances and activities

  • On the May 9, 1998, episode of Saturday Night Live (hosted by David Duchovny), Roker appeared in a “Mango” sketch with Matt Lauer. Usually, the sketch follows the fruitless pursuit of Mango by a character (portrayed by the cast member Chris Kattan). In the middle of this particular sketch, Roker appeared as the object of Lauer’s affection. Instead of the famous catch-phrase “Mango, Mango!” Lauer says, “Roker, ROKER!!”
  • During the first inaugural parade of President Barack Obama, Al Roker was able to get the “first interview” with the President by removing his Fedora hat and yelling to the walking President to come over. Acknowledging Roker, Ob ama continued walking along the parade route, telling him “it’s warm!”
  • Roker holds the record for most appearances on Late Night with Conan O'Brien, with over 30. He would often appear on the show as a last-minute replacement if a previously scheduled guest canceled their appearance.
  • Roker had a cameo appearance in Sharknado 2: The Second One, which premiered on Syfy on July 30, 2014.

http://wikipedia.thetimetube.com/?q=Al+Roker&lang=en

William Marshall

image
image
image
image
image
image

William Horace Marshall (August 19, 1924 – June 11, 2003) was an American actor, director, and opera singer. He is best known for his title role in the 1972 blaxploitation classic Blacula and its sequel Scream Blacula Scream (1973), as the “King of Cartoons” on the 1980s television show Pee-wee’s Playhouse beginning with its second season, and an appearance as Dr. Richard Daystrom on the original Star Trek television series. He had a commanding height of 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m), as well as a deep bass voice.

Biography

Early life and career

Marshall was born in Gary, Indiana, the son of Thelma (née Edwards) and Vereen Marshall, who was a dentist. He attended New York University as an art student, but then trained for a theatre career at the Actors Studio, at the American Theatre Wing, and with Sanford Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse.

He made his Broadway debut in 1944 in Carmen Jones. Among his many other Broadway appearances, he understudied Boris Karloff as Captain Hook in Peter Pan in 1950, then played the leading role of De Lawd in the 1951 revival of The Green Pastures (a role he repeated in a BBC telecast of the p lay in 1958). He performed in Shakespeare plays many times on the stage in the United States and Europe, including the title role in at least six productions of Othello. His Othello (which was later captured in a video production in 1981), was called by Harold Hobson of the London Sunday Times "the best Othello of our time,“ continuing:

…nobler than [Godfrey] Tearle, more martial than [John] Gielgud, more poetic than [Frederick] Valk. From his first entry, slender and magnificently tall, framed in a high Byzantine arch, clad in white samite, mystic, wonderful, a figure of Arabian romance and grace, to his last plunging of the knife into his stomach, Mr Marshall rode without faltering the play’s enormous rhetoric, and at the end the house rose to him.

Marshall even played Othello in a jazz musical version, Catch My Soul, with Jerry Lee Lewis as Iago, with Center Theatre Group at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles in 1968.

He also portrayed the roles of Paul Robeson and Frederick Douglass on stage . Marshall had researched Douglass’ life for years and portrayed him on television in Frederick Douglass: Slave and Statesman, which he co-produced in 1983.

Film and television career

Marshall’s career on screen began in the 1952 film Lydia Bailey as a Haitian leader. He followed that with a prominent role as Glycon, comrade and fellow gladiator to Victor Mature in the 1954 film Demetrius and the Gladiators. His demeanor, voice and stature gave him a wide range, though he was ill-suited for the subservient roles that many black actors of his generation were most frequently offered. He was a leader of the Mau-Mau uprising in Something of Value (1957), and Attorney General Edward Brooke in The Boston Strangler (1968). He probably received the most notice for his role in the vampire film Blacu la and its sequel Scream Blacula Scream. In later years, Marshall played the King of Cartoons on Pee-wee’s Playhouse, replacing actor Gilbert Lewis, during the 1980s. (The character’s catchphrase ”Let…the cartoooon…begin!“ became immensely popular.)

In the early 1950s, Marshall starred briefly in a series about black police officers, entitled Harlem Detective. The show was canceled when Marshall was named as a communist in the anti-communist newsletter Counterattack.

Despite the blacklisting because of his supposed communist connections, Marshall managed to continue appearing in both television and films. In 1962, Marshall appeared on the British spy series Danger Man in the episode titled "Deadline” and in 1964 Marshall played the role of travelling opera singer Thomas Bowers on the Bonanza episode “Enter Thomas Bowers.” Additionally in 1964, he appeared, with actor Ivan Dixon, as the leader of a newly independent African nation and as a T.H.R.U.S.H. agent in the first-season episode of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. entitled “The Vulcan Affair”. In 1968 he appeared as Dr. Richard Daystrom in the Star Trek episode “The Ultimate Computer”. In 1969, he had a special guest appearance as the character Amalek in an episode of The Wild Wild West entitled “The Night of the Egyptian Queen”.

He also won two local Emmys for producing and performing in a PBS production, As Adam Early in the Morning, a theatre piece originally performed on stage. He also was featured in an episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour titled, “The Jar”, with actors Pat Buttram and George Lindsey.

Later life and death

In addition to acting and producing, Marshall taught acting at various universities i ncluding the University of California, Irvine, and the Mufandi Institute, an African-American arts and music institution in the Watts section of Los Angeles. He did similar work at Chicago’s ETA Creative Arts Foundation, which in 1992 named Marshall one of its Epic Men of the 20th century.

For 42 years, Marshall was the partner of Sylvia Gussin Jarrico, former wife of blacklisted screenwriter Paul Jarrico. Marshall died June 11, 2003, from complications arising from Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. He was survived by sons Tariq, Malcolm, and Claude Marshall and daughter Gina Loring. Eulogists at his funeral included Sidney Poitier, Ivan Dixon, Paul Winfield, and Marla Gibbs.

Marshall was considered by many to be a much underrated actor and one who never got his due. Some have remarked that Marshall should have had a much more successful and larger screen career, even saying that Marshall would have been a perfect choice for the role Thulsa Doom in Cona n the Barbarian.

Filmography

  • Lydia Bailey (1952) - King Dick
  • Demetrius and the Gladiators (1954) - Glycon
  • Something of Value (1957) - Leader - Intellectual in Suit
  • Sabu and the Magic Ring (1957) - Ubal, the genie
  • La fille de feu (1958) - Stork
  • Piedra de toque (1963) - African Missionary (uncredited)
  • To Trap a Spy (1964) - Sekue Ashumen
  • The Hell with Heroes (1968) - Al Poland
  • The Boston Strangler (1968) - Atty. Gen. Edward W. Brooke
  • Skullduggery (1970) - Attorney General
  • The Mask of Sheba (1970) - Captain Condor Sekallie
  • Zig Zag (1970) - Morris Bronson
  • Honky (1971) - Dr. Craig Smith
  • Blacula (1972) - Blacula / Mamuwalde
  • Scream Blacula Scream (1973) - Blacula / Mamuwalde
  • < i>Abby (1974) - Bishop Garnet Williams
  • Twilight’s Last Gleaming (1977) - William Klinger - Attorney General
  • The Great Skycopter Rescue (1980) - Mr. Jason
  • Vasectomy: A Delicate Matter (1986) - Dr. Dean
  • Amazon Women on the Moon (1987) - Pirate Captain (segment “Video Pirates”)
  • Maverick (1994) - Riverboat Poker Player
  • Sorceress (1995) - John Geiger
  • Dinosaur Valley Girls (1996) - Dr. Benjamin Michaels (final film role)

Wikipedia

Tracie Thoms

image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Tracie Nicole Thoms (born August 19, 1975) is an American television, film, and stage actress. She is best known for her roles in Rent, Cold Case, The Devil Wears Prada, Death Proof, and the short-lived Fox television series Wonderfalls.

Early life and education

Thoms was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, the daughter of Mariana (Davis) and Donald H. T homs, a VP of Programming at PBS and television director. She has a younger brother, Austin. She started studying acting at age 10 and later on attended the Baltimore School for the Arts.

She earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Howard University in 1997. She then attended the Juilliard School’s Drama Division as a member of Group 30 (1997–2001), which also included actors Lee Pace and Anthony Mackie.

Career

Thoms is known for her role of Mahandra McGinty in the television show Wonderfalls. She also played the part of Sasha in the US version of the T.V. series As If, which was cancelled after three episodes. Most recently she has been added to the cast of the CBS crime drama Cold Case, as the homicide detective, Kat Miller. Thoms has also made guest appearances on Law & Order and The Shield.

Thoms has appeared in several movies, most notably in the film adaptation of the Broadway musical Ren t in which she plays Joanne Jefferson, lawyer and lover of Maureen Johnson (Idina Menzel). She took over the role from Fredi Walker, who played Joanne in the original Broadway production of Rent but decided not to reprise her role due to her age. Prior to being cast as Joanne, Thoms had considered herself a fan of the show, having seen it on Broadway several times.

She was featured in the 2002 Comedy Central film Porn ‘n Chicken and the 2004 films Brother to Brother and The Warrior Class. Thoms appeared in the 2006 film version of The Devil Wears Prada as Lily. Thoms has completed filming on the City Lights Pictures movie Descent along with Rent co-stars Wilson Jermaine Heredia and Rosario Dawson and will soon begin filming Jimmie with co-stars Vanessa Williams and Brian McKnight. She appeared in Quentin Tarantino's Death Proof, alongside Zoë Bell, Rosario Dawson and Mary Elizabeth Wi nstead.

Thoms made her Broadway debut in Regina Taylor's Drowning Crow. She has also appeared in several off-Broadway and regional productions, including Up Against the Wind (New York Theater Workshop), The Oedipus Plays (The Shakespeare Theater), A Raisin in the Sun (Baltimore CenterStage) Joe Turner’s Come and Gone (Missouri Rep), The Exonerated (Off Broadway’s The Culture Project) and The Antigone Project (The Women’s Project). On July 18, 2008, she joined the final cast of Rent starting July 26, 2008, reprising the character of Joanne, replacing Merle Dandridge. The final performance was made into a DVD: Rent: Filmed Live on Broadway.

Thoms reprised her role as Joanne for another production of Rent, directed by Neil Patrick Harris, at the Hollywood Bowl from August 6–8, 2010.

In the fall of 2010 she appeared in the concert revue For The Record: Quenti n Tarantino in Los Angeles, presented by ROCKLA for Show at Barre. It ran from August 12, 2010, to October 30, 2010, and also starred Jenna Leigh Green, Autumn Reeser, Ty Taylor, and Audra Mae. From November 2010 through January 2011, Thoms starred in Show At Barre's For The Record: John Hughes, alongside Barrett Foa, Von Smith and Ty Taylor. In 2011 she appeared at Show At Barre in the revue For the Record: Baz Luhrmann, from February 12, 2011, to June 30, 2011, with Jenna Leigh Green, Arielle Jacobs, Tinuke Oyefule and Kate Reinders.

She played Etta, Diana’s personal assistant, in NBC's Wonder Woman pilot.

Thoms had a role in the 2014 version of Annie, playing Annie’s “fake mother”, a character based on Lily St. Regis in the original musical.

http://wikipedia.thetimetube.com/?q=Tracie+Thoms&lang=en

Paula Jai Parker

image
image
image
image
image
image

Paula Jai Parker (born August 19, 1969) is an American actress, comedian and director. She had number of supporting roles in films, including Friday (1995), Sprung (1997), Why Do Fools Fall in Love (1998), Phone Booth (2002), Hustle & Flow (2005), and Idlewild(2006). Parker also known for her voice of Trudy Proud in the Disney Channel animated comedy series, The Proud Family (2001-2005).

Early life

Parker was born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, but moved to Washington, D.C. in 1987 to study at Howard University. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree, she moved to New York City and played a number of clubs. From 1992 to 1993, she performed on the FOX comedy program The Apollo Comedy Hour, filmed live at the legendary Apollo Theater, and later was cast member on the short-lived sketch show, Townsend Television.

Career

In 1995, Parker has made her film debut in the F. Gary Gray urban comedy Friday. In same year, she earned a Cable ACE Award for her role in the HBO anthology presentation, Cosmic Slop. Later that year, Parker returned to television in the WB sitcom, The Wayans Bros. opposite Shawn and Marlon Wayans. Throughout the 1990s, she appeared in several short-lived shows, including CBS sitcomThe Weird Al Show (1997), and David E. Kelley’s ABC comedy-drama, Snoops (1999).

During 1990s, Parker had supporting roles in a number of films. She has appeared in the 1995 horror anthology Tales from the Hood, Spike Lee’s Million Man March drama Get on the Bus (1996), the urban comedy Sprung (1997), Jada Pinkett Smith starring romantic comedy Woo (1997), the Frankie Lymon biography, Why Do Fools Fall in Love (1998). In the early 2000s, Parker co-starred in 30 Years to Life, High Crime s, Phone Booth, and My Baby’s Daddy. In 2004, she played the lesbian woman in the LGBT comedy-drama,She Hate Me, and appeared as Ruth Brown in biographical film Ray. Her breakthrough has in the 2005 independent drama Hustle & Flow starring Terrence Howard. She later was cast opposite Howard in musical film Idlewild (2006).

From 2001 to 2005, Parker voiced the sophisticated matriarch Trudy Proud in the Disney Channel animated comedy series, The Proud Family. She also voiced her role in the 2005 film The Proud Family Movie. She also played the role of Billie Holiday on the episode of Touched by an Angel in 2000, and later guest starred on The Shield, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, My Name Is Earl, andThe Mentalist. She co-starred in the 2007 thriller film Cover starring Aunjanue Ellis, and in later years worked in low-profile independent movies.

From 2013 to 2014, Parker had the recurr ing role in the HBO series, True Blood during show’ seventh and final season. In 2014, she was cast as one of five leads on the TV One reality series, Hollywood Divas. In 2015, Parker was cast in the recurring roles on the Amazon drama Hand of God, and ABC Family series, Recovery Road.

Personal life

Parker married Forrest Martin in 2004. The couple met on the set of Hustle & Flow, where Forrest, who had just graduated with a Master of Fine Arts was working as an intern. Paula almost passed on shooting the critically acclaimed movie and only took the part at the urging of her manager. They have one son, Onederful.

http://wikipedia.thetimetube.com/?q=Paula+Jai+Parker&lang=en

Mary Ellen Pleasant

image
image
image
image
image
image

Mary Ellen Pleasant (born 19 August 1814 – 1817 - died 4 January 1904) was a 19th-century African American entrepreneur widely known as Mistress Pleasant. She identified herself as “a capitalist by profession” in the 1890 United States Census. People called her “Mammy” Pleasant but she did not approve. Mistress Pleasant used her fortune to further the abolitionist movement. She worked on the Underground Railroad across many states and then helped bring it to California during the Gold Rush Era. She was a friend and financial supporter of John Brown, and was well known in abolitionist circles. After the Civil War, she took her battles to the courts in the 1860s and won several civil rights victories, one of which was cited and upheld in the 1980s and resulted in her being called “The Mother of Human Rights in California”.

Early years

Pleasant made contr adictory claims about her earliest years, and her exact origin remains unclear. Her birthday is known to be August 19, but the year is in dispute. Her gravestone at Tulocay Cemetery in Napa, California, states 1812, although most sources list her birth as 1814. In one version of her memoirs dictated to her god-daughter, Charlotte Downs, she claimed she was born a slave to a Voodoo priestess and the youngest son of a Governor of Virginia, James Pleasants. In any case, she showed up in Nantucket, Massachusetts circa 1827 as a 10- to 13-year-old bonded servant to a storekeeper, “Grandma” Hussey. She worked out her bondage, then became a family member and lifelong friend to Hussey’s granddaughter Phoebe Hussey Gardner. The Husseys were deeply involved in the abolitionist movement, and Pleasant met many of the famous abolitionists.

Career and marriages

With the support of the Hussey/Gardners, she often passed as white. Pleasant married James Smith, a wealthy flour contractor and plantation owner who had freed his slaves and was also able to pass as white. She worked with Smith as a “slave stealer” on the Underground Railroad until his death about four years later. They transported slaves to northern states such as Ohio and even as far as Canada. Smith left instructions and money for her to continue the work after his death.

She began a partnership with John James (“J.J.”) Pleasants circa 1848. Although no official records exist of their marriage, it was probably conducted by their friend Captain Gardner, Phoebe’s husband, aboard his boat. They continued Smith’s work for a few more years, when increasing attention from slavers forced a move to New Orleans. J.J. Pleasants appears to have been a close relative of Marie Laveau’s husband, and there is some indication that Pleasant and Laveau met and consulted many times before Pleasant left New Orleans by boat for San Francisco in April 1852. J. J. had gone ahead and written back that the area seemed promising for the Underground Railroad.

When Mary Ellen arrived in San Francisco, she passed as white, using her first husband’s name among the whites, and took jobs running exclusive men’s eating establishments, starting with the Case and Heiser. She met most of the founders of the city as she catered lavish meals, and she benefited from the tidbits of financial gossip and deals usually tossed around at the tables. She engaged a young clerk, Thomas Bell, at the Bank of California and they began to make money based on her tips and guidance. Thomas made money of his own, especially in quicksilver, and by 1875 they had amassed a 30 million dollar fortune between them. J.J., who had worked with Mary Ellen from the slave-stealing days to the civil rights court battles of the 1860s and ‘70s, died in 1877 of diabetes.

Mary Ellen did not conceal her race from other blacks, and was adept at finding jobs for those brought in by Underground Railroad activities. Some of the people she sponsored became important black leaders in the city. She left San Francisco from 1857 to 1859 to help John Brown. She was said to have actively supported his cause with money and work. There was a note from her in his pocket when he was arrested after the Harpers Ferry Armory incident, but as it was only signed with the initials “MEP” (which were misread as “WEP”) she was not caught. She returned to San Francisco to continue her work there, where she was known as the “Black City Hall”.

After the Civil War, Pleasant publicly changed her racial designation in the City Directory from “White” to “Black”, causing a little stir among some whites. She began a series of court battles to fight laws prohibiting blacks from riding trolleys and other such abuses.

Suing over streetcar segregation

Pleasant successfully attacked racial discrimi nation in San Francisco public conveyances after she and two other black women were ejected from a city streetcar in 1866. She filed two lawsuits. The first, against the Omnibus Railroad Company, was withdrawn after the company promised to allow African-Americans to board their streetcars. The second case, Pleasant v. North Beach & Mission Railroad Company, went to the California Supreme Court and took two years to complete. In the city, the case outlawed segregation in the city’s public conveyances. However, at the State Supreme Court, the damages awarded against her at the trial court were reversed and found excessive.

Later life

Later in life, a series of court battles with Sarah Althea Hill, Senator William Sharon, and Thomas Bell’s widow damaged Pleasant’s reputation and cost her resources and wealth. Pleasant died in San Francisco, California on January 4, 1904 in poverty.

Late in life, she was befriended by Olive Sherwood, a nd she was buried in the Sherwood family plot in Tulocay Cemetery, Napa, California. Her gravesite is marked with a metal sculpture that was dedicated on June 11, 2011 .

Posthumous recognition

Pleasant has been featured or mentioned in several works of fiction. Michelle Cliff’s 1993 book “Free Enterprise” is subtitled “A Novel of Mary Ellen Pleasant” and features her abolitionist activities. The ghost of Mary Ellen Pleasant is a character in the 1997 novel Earthquake Weather, by Tim Powers. Karen Joy Fowler’s historical novel Sister Noon, published in 2001, features Pleasant as a central character, and Thomas Bell and Teresa Bell as secondary characters.

Pleasant has also been discussed in film and television. The 2008 documentary Meet Mary Pleasant covered her life, and a segment of a 2013 episode of the Comedy Central series Drunk History covered Pleasant’s life. Pleasant was portrayed by Lisa Bonet.

In 1974, the city of San Francisco designated eucalyptus trees that Pleasant had planted outside her mansion at the southwest corner of Octavia and Bush streets in San Francisco as a Structure of Merit. The trees and associated plaque are now known as Mary Ellen Pleasant Memorial Park, which is the smallest park in San Francisco. Her burial site has been designated a “Network to Freedom” site by the National Park Service.

Wikipedia

Lorenzo Tucker

image
image
image
image
image
image

Lorenzo Tucker (June 27, 1907 – August 19, 1986), known as the “Black Valentino,” was an African-American stage and screen actor who played the romantic lead in the early black films of Oscar Micheaux.

Acting career

Born in Philadelphia, Tucker started acting at Temple University where he was a student . Tucker also appeared early in his career with Bessie Smith on cross-country tours.

From 1926 to 1946, Tucker appeared in 18 of Micheaux’s films, including When Men Betray (1928); Wages of Sin (1929); Easy Street (1930); Harlem Big ShowVeiled Aristocrats (1932); Ten Minutes To Live (1932); Harlem After Midnight (1934); Temptation (1935); and Underworld (1937). He became known as the “Black Valentino” because of his good looks and role as the romantic lead in the early black cinema. Tucker noted the irony of the appellation since he believed Rudolph Valentino had a darker complexion than Tucker. He became a movie star to black America and was often mentioned in the leading black newspapers. One of Micheaux and Tucker’s most controversial films was Veiled Aristocrats where Tucker played a bla ck man who passed as white and tried to persuade his sister also to pass for white. He also made an uncredited cameo appearance with Paul Robeson in 1933's The Emperor Jones.

Tucker was also a successful stage actor, appearing on Broadway in The Constant SinnerOl’ Man Satan, and Humming Sam. His most controversial role came in The Constant Sinner in which he portrayed a pimp, Money Johnson, and in which Mae West was his prostitute, Babe Gordon. Though miscegenation was still outlawed in some parts of the south, the play included a scene in which Tucker kissed West. When the play opened in Washington, D.C., the press was outraged to see a black man kissing a white woman, and demands were made that the scene be excised from the play. West rejected demands, and the play left Washington. The Shuberts refused to permit Tucker to play the role, and the Greek-American actor George Givot was hired to play the role wearing blackface. Despite the Shuberts’ decision, West cast Tucker in a few minor parts, including the role of a Spaniard who walks across the stage. When a woman asks West’s character who that is, West responded, “Oh, he’s Spanish — he’s my Spanish fly!”

Later years

During World War II, Tucker was a tail gunner in the U.S. Army Air Corps. After the war, Tucker appeared in Louis Jordan’s film Reet, Petite and Gone; in the early 1950s, he returned to the stage appearing in a London production of Anna Lucasta.

Tucker later became an autopsy technician for the New York City medical examiner, where he worked on the bodies of Malcolm X and Nina Mae McKinney.

Tucker died of lung cancer at age 79 at his home in Hollywood, California. His funeral took place at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church.

Honors and awards

In 1974, Tucker was inducted into the Black Film Makers Hall of Fame, and he received the Audelco Recognition Award in 1981. On the November 14, 1985 “Denise Drives” episode of 

The Cosby Show

, Clair Huxtable quizzes Denise Huxtable on car safety asking if she should stop her car for a stranger on a dark rainy night with “hair like Lorenzo Tucker, eyes like Billy Dee and a smile like Nat King Cole.”

Wikipedia

Johnny Nash

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

John Lester (Johnny) Nash, Jr. (born August 19, 1940) is an American reggae singer-songwriter, best known in the US for his 1972 comeback hit, “I Can See Clearly Now”. He was also one of the first non-Jamaican singers to record reggae music in Kingston, Jamaica.

Life and musical career

Born John Lester Nash, Jr. in Houston, Texas, he began as a pop singer in the 1950s. He released four albums for ABC-Paramount, with his self named debut in 1958. Around 20 singles were released between 1958 & 1964 on a variety of labels such as Groove, Chess, Argo and Warners. He also enjoyed success as an actor early in his career appearing in the screen version of playwright Louis S. Peterson's Take a Giant Step. Nash won a Silver Sail Award for his performance from the Locarno International Film Festival.

In 1965, Johnny Nash and Danny Sims formed the JODA Records l abel in New York. One of the more interesting signings was four brothers from Newport, Rhode Island, ages 9, 11, 15 and 16, called The Cowsills, before signing with Mercury/Philips with Shelby Singleton, before MGM and their first million selling hit single, “The Rain, The Park & Other Things”. The Cowsills went into the studio in New York with studio musicians and recorded a number of songs like “Either You Do Or You Don’t” and “You Can’t Go Halfway”. Eventually The Cowsills would write and record their own song, “All I Really Wanta Be Is Me”, which became the group’s debut single release on JODA (J-103).

Besides “I Can See Clearly Now,” Nash recorded several hits in Jamaica, where he travelled in early 1968, as his girlfriend had family links with local TV and radio host and novel writer Neville Willoughby. Nash planned to try breaking the local rocksteady sound in the United States. Willoughby i ntroduced him to a local struggling vocal group, Bob Marley & The Wailing Wailers, Members Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh and Rita Marley introduced him to the local scene. Nash signed all four to an exclusive recording contract with his JAD label and also an exclusive publishing contract with Cayman music. An advance was paid in the form of a weekly wage and JAD also financed some of their recordings, some with Byron Lee’s Dragonaires and some with other local musicians such as Jackie Jackson and Lynn Taitt. None of the Marley and Tosh songs he produced were successful. Only two singles were released at the time: “Bend Down Low” (JAD 1968) and “Reggae on Broadway” (Columbia, 1972), which was recorded in London in 1972 on the same sessions that produced “I Can See Clearly Now.” It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the R.I.A.A. in November 1972. The I Can See Clearly Now album includes four origina l Marley compositions published by JAD: “Guava Jelly”, “Comma Comma”, “You Poured Sugar On Me” and the follow-up hit “Stir It Up”. “There Are More Questions Than Answers” was a third hit single taken from the album.

Nash was also active as a composer in the Swedish romance Vill så gärna tro (1971) in which he portrayed Robert. The film soundtrack, partly instrumental reggae with strings, was co-composed by Bob Marley and arranged by Fred Jordan.

JAD Records ceased to exist in 1971, but it was revived in 1997 by American Marley specialist Roger Steffens and French musician and producer Bruno Blum for the “Complete Bob Marley & the Wailers 1967-1972” ten-album series for which several of the Nash-produced Marley and Tosh tracks were mixed or remixed by Blum for release. Nash’s biggest hits were the early reggae (rocksteady) tunes “Hold Me Tight” (a #5 hit i n the US and the UK, the tune used more than a year earlier in Score commercials) and “Stir It Up”, the latter written by Bob Marley prior to Marley’s international success. In the UK, his biggest hit was with the song “Tears On My Pillow” which reached number one in the UK Singles Chart in July 1975 for one week.

After a hit version of Sam Cooke’s “Wonderful World” and “Let’s Go Dancing” in 1979, for many years he seemed to have dropped out of sight, with the exception of a brief resurgence in the mid-1980s with the album Here Again (1986), which was preceded by the minor UK hit, “Rock Me Baby”; however, in May 2006 he was singing again at SugarHill Recording Studios and at Tierra Studios in his native Houston. Working with SugarHill chief engineer Andy Bradley and Tierra Studios’ grammy-winning Randy Miller, he began the work of transferring analog tapes of his songs from the 1970s an d 1980s to Pro Tools digital format.

Acting career

Johnny Nash has four acting credits in film and television. In 1959, he had the lead role as Spencer Scott in Take a Giant Step, directed by Philip Leacock, one of the first black family films written by a black. In 1960 he appeared as “Apple” alongside Dennis Hopper in the crime drama Key Witness. In 1971, he played Robert in the Swedish romance Vill så gärna tro.

http://wikipedia.thetimetube.com/?q=Johnny+Nash&lang=en

We make Tumblr themes